Growing Up With Antibiotics, Growing Up With Asthma?

Growing Up With Antibiotics, Growing Up With Asthma?

By Editorial Staff

In the latest (but probably not the last) research to associate antibiotic use during infancy with the development of asthma, three studies suggest exposure to antibiotics (either prescribed to the pregnant mother or the child during the first year after birth) increases the risk that the child will suffer from asthma.

The first study found that “both prenatal (before birth) and post-natal exposure to antibiotics was associated with an increased risk of asthma.” Building on this, the second study noted: “Antibiotic use in the first year life is associated with an increased risk of early-onset childhood asthma that began before 3 years of age. The apparent effect has a clear dose response” (the more you take, the greater the risk).

asthma - Copyright – Stock Photo / Register MarkThe third study compared babies born in urban areas with those born in rural areas. While a number of factors increased the risk of asthma, “the use of antibiotics” was one factor contributing to development of the condition, particularly in urban areas.

Talk to your doctor about the risk-benefit profile of any medication you’re prescribed / recommended (including over-the-counter products); then make an informed decision on whether it’s worth the risk.

Prevent Arthritis Pain With Fiber

Prevent Arthritis Pain With Fiber

By Editorial Staff

Fiber has been shown to promote numerous positive health benefits, including bowel health, blood sugar control, cholesterol reduction and weight maintenance. But pain prevention? Yes, at least knee pain due to arthritis, according to recent research.

According to a study of middle-age (early 50’s at the start of the study) adults, people who eat the most fiber are less likely to suffer osteoarthritis-related knee pain and stiffness. The study of more than 1,200 adults found the top quarter of fiber consumers had a significant reduction in their risk of knee OA (61 percent lower risk) compared to the bottom quarter of fiber consumers. Knee OA was assessed nine years after the initial assessments, showing fiber intake earlier in life can have an impact on knee OA risk during later years.

arthritis - Copyright – Stock Photo / Register MarkThe study authors speculate that fiber may reduce the risk by two mechanisms: 1) reducing inflammation, which can cause pain; and 2) helping maintain a healthy weight, which puts less stress on joints and bones. To learn more about osteoarthritis and fiber, talk to your doctor. Click here for five easy ways to get more fiber in your daily diet.

Why You Should Be Making Periodic Visits to Your Chiropractor

Why You Should Be Making Periodic Visits to Your Chiropractor

By Editorial Staff at TO YOUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

When you experience back pain, chiropractic care can help relieve the pain and identify the underlying cause. But your care shouldn’t stop once the pain stops (or comes back, which can frequently happen).

A new study suggests maintenance chiropractic care (defined by the researchers as “treatment at regular intervals regardless of symptoms”) is more effective than symptomatic treatment (receiving chiropractic treatment only when you’re experiencing pain).

In the study, patients with recurrent / persistent low back pain who received maintenance care (scheduled every 1-3 months) after their initial treatment reported an average of 19.3 less days of “bothersome” low back pain over a 12-month period compared to patients who received only symptomatic chiropractic care. Overall, during the 12-month period, maintenance care patients made seven visits, on average, to their chiropractor, versus five visits, on average, for symptomatic patients.

So, if you’re suffering low back pain and your chiropractor suggests you come in periodically for treatment, you may want to heed his/her advice. It’s a research-supported suggestion that could dramatically reduce the amount of time you spend in pain.